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Understanding the term "remains unknown" in this context . .

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Abdul-illah

New member
Jan 19, 2021
2
0
1
Hi, I and my colleague (second language speakers) got in an argument in understanding the sentences "The aim of this study" and "remains unknown" in the context of the below
scientific report,
The questions are:
1- Does the sentence “remains unknown” in an Abstract/Objectives section indicate that the “unknown” to be continued till the end of this study?!;
2- at what it's referring to (remains unknown)?
3- does "The aim of this study" to reveal this “unknown” matter?

Appreciating your help


remains unknown.JPG

Source:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7361712/
 

englishgeek

Active member
Sep 23, 2020
255
31
28
Thank you joining the forum.

This is how I read it.

"remains unknown" means that we have investigated or researched this phenomena, but we still don't know the why this happens.

What is unknown? The high frequency and strong association of olfactory/gustatory impairment with Covid-19.

I would write this more simply as, "there is a strong association between taste and Covid-19, but we still don't know why this occurs".

I guess you know what is olfactory is but here is the definition for anyone interested:

Olfactory derives from the past participle of the Latin olfacere, which means "to smell" and which was formed from the verb olēre (also "to smell") and facere ("to do"). Olfactory is a word that often appears in scientific contexts (as in "olfactory nerves," the nerves that pass from the nose to the brain and contain the receptors that make smelling possible), but it has occasionally branched out into less specialized contexts. The pleasant smell of spring flowers, for example, might be considered an "olfactory delight." A related word, olfaction, is a noun referring to the sense of smell or the act or process of smelling.

Gustatory is a member of a finite set of words that describe the senses with which we encounter our world, the other members being visual, aural,olfactory, and tactile. Like its peers, gustatory has its roots in Latin-in this case the Latin word gustare, meaning "to taste." Gustare is a somewhat distant relative of several common English words, among them choose and disgust, but is a direct ancestor only of gustatory, gustation, meaning "the act or sensation of tasting," and degustation, meaning "the action or an instance of tasting especially in a series of small portions."

 

Abdul-illah

New member
Jan 19, 2021
2
0
1
Thank you englishgeek for the available feedback

Can we consider the “unknown” is referring to the spontaneous evolution and the strong association of olfactory/gustatory impairment with Covid-19. (Biologically),

and the "The aim of this study" is about the evaluation of this impairment within Covid-19 patients (field study and survey) which is the study is all about?
What do you think?

If the phrase “remains unknown” means to be continued unknown, do we understand from it that the study has not made it known?
 

englishgeek

Active member
Sep 23, 2020
255
31
28
Can we consider the “unknown” is referring to the spontaneous evolution and the strong association of olfactory/gustatory impairment with Covid-19. (Biologically),
I believe so, yes.

"The aim of this study" is about the evaluation of this impairment within Covid-19 patients (field study and survey) which is the study is all about?
What do you think?
Basically, yes.

I think "remains unknown" is referring to the fact that they still don't know why or how this problem (loss of smell/taste) started in Covid-19 patients.

Conclusion

Knowledge of spontaneous evolution of olfactory disorders allows reassuring patients and planning therapeutic strategies for persistent olfactory dysfunction after having definitely recovered from COVID‐19.

In simple English, I would say "knowledge of how smell and taste problems occur with Covid-19 patients can help to know how to treat patients who continue to have problems with smell and taste even after they have recovered from Covid-19".