It predicates of

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alexpeter_pen

New member
Jun 15, 2021
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The usage of "it predicates of" is killing me.

It predicates of the state of John across the square being characterized as a state of running.

What!?!?!

I would say that, on a given occasion of its use, it predicates of certain things that they number more than zero.

Whaaaat?!?!?!?

What is cause and effect here?

it predicates of certain things that they number more than zero = there are certain things that are able to assert that their number is more than zero, right?

How would you create an equivalent sentence structure to completely whacked

It predicates of A that B it is C.

(The second "it" and A are the same thing, right?)

Help
 

alexpeter_pen

New member
Jun 15, 2021
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Are you referencing a book or something?

No. It is a common usage, even though it is rare. It says that it means having the quality or property of in the dictionary but I cannot untangle the sentence structure.

For example (and it is always as it seems some special new logic someone is introducing)

Their thesis is that zero is simply an ordinary numeral, no different from three, but that it predicates of a plurality that it has zero members. That would account for why it seems to be parallel to ordinary numerals in most respects, but it entails a bold ontological commitment: that there are pluralities with no members.

it predicates of a plurality that it has zero members = it assumes that there is a plurality which has zero members

All I want is equivalent statement for general form.

It predicates of A that B it is C. = it assumes that there is such A which due to B means A is C.
 

englishgeek

Active member
Sep 23, 2020
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It would seem that you are referring to this definition:

to assert to be a quality, attribute, or property —used with following of


My guess is what the author is saying, is that there are groups with no members and even if a group has no members, you can still call it a group. (group/organization/society or political party).
 

alexpeter_pen

New member
Jun 15, 2021
3
0
1
It would seem that you are referring to this definition:

to assert to be a quality, attribute, or property —used with following of


My guess is what the author is saying, is that there are groups with no members and even if a group has no members, you can still call it a group. (group/organization/society or political party).

Yeah, in this particular instance, but I would love to understand it in general usage.

It predicates of A that B = it presupposes that there is such A for which B = there is such A that B

Right?

it predicates of a plurality that it has zero members = (it assumes that) there is such plurality that has zero members
it predicates of a plurality that it... = it predicates (out) of all possible pluralities that one which...
 
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